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lot did not take in end. under the law, if you did not file a complaint with the government within six months of the first discriminatory paycheck she got decades before, if she did not file a complaint, whether she knew about it or not, within six months of the first is the mandatory paycheck, -- first discriminatory paycheck, that employer was home free. it could pay her less every paycheck from then on. open and explicitly. there was nothing she could do about it except leave the job. that is what the supreme court said congress meant when it passed these laws prohibiting pay discrimination. it was a vigorous dissent from justice and ruth bader ginsberg that this made no sense whatsoever. she was joined by three other justices. first of all, who knowsafter six months that you pay is less -- second, if you know and you have enough of evidence, are you going to file a complaint within six months of the paycheck? are you going to figure, ok,i will prove my work and not be labeled as a troublemaker. it basically took that decision in what have some called a technicality and took away wo
the existing law and involved in the in that examinations of the impediments to affect the resolution and we are working on a cooperative basis to overcome those. so in conclusion, dodd-frank is certainly given the significant new responsibilities to address these risks associated in the recent financial crisis. you take these responsibilities seriously and we are ready to use these authorities when they are needed. hopefully not. but while the key provisions are now in place, we are continuing to implement the remaining provisions in rulemaking and we continue to refine our thinking on the process we increase transparency in the rest of the market's on these powerful new tools and how they can best be used to maintain financial stability and end to big to fail. i look forward to participating in the q&a. thank you very much. [applause] >> now for the downside. first i want to thank you professor bachmann for organizing this. it's an excellent panel i must say and i've always enjoyed being on the panel with space and rick. laughter come i want to take on everything that was said, so let me g
cost, u.n. basic needs exposing [speaker not understood] obliged by law for humanity to promote free speech propagation, [speaker not understood] for human and environmental marketing ownership and production, socialist capitalism, [speaker not understood], fascism. two centuries, republican democratic bodies, ability to gain, plan, life, death, whisper, come together, constitutional democracy. but aged emotional symphonic [speaker not understood], pointing had i finger to an introduction to a [speaker not understood] in logic. * his finger >>> good afternoon. good afternoon, president chiu and supervisors. ♪ you know that i would be untrue you know that i would be a city liar if i was to say to you this city couldn't get much higher come on city lit the city fire city, city lit the city fire sfgtv graphics go onset the city night on fire ♪ you know that it would be untrue you know you got to make peace awhile then you can really smile and make it really noaa while come on city light the city with the city fire come on city light the city fire [speaker not understood] ♪ you k
boots on the ground and will at the political level to enforce the law and appears that we need state level support as well. >> thank you, so this is a big picture question. miss dillon. >> what do you think that the legislature can do to address the systemic problems with the finances. >> that is a big picture question, it is a tough question. i think that in the long term a lot of the problems that we have here in the budget relate to the ease at which citizens can put ballot box budgeting measure into his our state rule books and they don't sunset and the legislature has increasing little control as well as the government what can and cannot be cut every year. this is a problem that is not caused by democrats or republicans or the structure of our system. that is one thing that i would try to change is have legislation passed that would allow any such provisions that are sponsored by citizens and maybe even provisions that are sponsored by legislatures such as a senator to sunset or be examined regularly by some type of a commission. as to whether they remain valid. that is the big
designed to collect possible automation in a way that can scrub the laws. so you have these distinctions between methods and the missions of wikileaks versus traditional press such that if the government decides to bring a case in wikileaks i have some confidence that the rest of the press will not be chilled. but, obviously that is a tough line to draw. and it is getting tougher and tougher with more immediate, more news being disseminated by sort of these alternative routes , bloggers and the like. >> so let's do one more question here and then we will take some from the audience and a couple of minutes. so picking up, again, on the judge's comments about -- about some extent of over classification or misclassification and also on cans discussion of the hard issues that are posed by the legitimate was a blow or, the person who legitimately is motivated to disclose some kind of wrongdoing. i once asked about something that we hear a lot in cases about discovery in civil lawsuits. not so much. the idea that, perhaps, something is government conduct is arguably unlawful in some respects,
parenthood. it didn't become law, and the government didn't shut down. you didn't have to -- >> moderator: gentlemen, i guess let me jump ahead to a topic i was thinking of taking up later, but since it's on the table, congressman dold, your opponent says that on the 20 most important votes you did not break with your leaders even once, and that led the tea party to pull congress to the fringe. what is your response? dold: that was, actually, 24 votes. 20% of those votes pass with the the democratic majority. ten of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times
district alone that means cuts of a billion dollars for our seniors. this law was not well thought out. it was not bipartisan but it was very partisan approach to health care reform transit do you have another plan? buerkle: yes, we do. >> maybe we can get to that with our follow-up question you. this is about medicare. as the population ages, the current cost projections for medicare our financial and sustainable the nation. so which of the several floated plans out there to put medicare on stronger financial footing do you support and why? we will begin with dan maffei. maffei: it's extremely important we save medicare, as a guaranteed benefit. the wait is now. not just for today's generation but for future generations to ann marie buerkle says if you're over 55 don't worry. there's real reasons why you should worry. if you're under 55 you better watch out because she wants to change it. the ryan budget should vote for makes into the voucher program. that's one way to handle it but there are other ways. medicare needs some adjustments but fundamentally it's a program that works. what
to their name. that is by law. so it's very easy to target black voters. now, as it turns out i started going through these names. i will give you one name, okay? from in the book here where i show you the actual purge list in "billionaires & ballot bandits." there is a mr. robert moore convicted of a felony crime and so all the black robert moore's in florida lost their. there are a few in florida but not only robert moore's from florida but brought moore, bobby more's they said these were covers for for the spell in trying to, including mrs. bobby moore. mr. moore gets convicted of a crime and mrs. bobby moore loses her vote but they got thing -- one thing right. she is b. al: a and by the way when i say she is, this is not from kathryn harrison's list. this is from a current list used by the state of florida, in which every single voter on this list, everyone, no exception, their only crime is voting while black. we can't find -- "the new york times" took four years to pick up the story for me, for years and it was on top of the bbc nightly news and they said the list was flawed. no, it's
with you. the body of law and rule is incredibly complicated. some of that does pertain to the evil banker hypothesis. i'm amended hereby the corollary evil lobbyist hypothesis, but i would add my own cause, which is the cubicle regulator aided and abetted by the expert lawyer hypothesis. and maybe in my practice i spend a lot of time. and the bells of these rules. and when you say okay, i think i had it. here's the definition of proprietary trading. some lawyer will say well, actually there was lawler versus knickerbocker case in 1842 in which that definition was not upheld -- so for this to be really clear, with another 52 pages in the federal register. that may be good lawyering, but it is incoherent rulemaking. i don't know what to do about it. i just say this is one of my personally favored hypotheses is a big problem of complexity risk and why i go back to a few clear standards to which real institutions accountable, i written on the poker rules mav is hispanic@. we have to make some clear decisions here. this current come in never never land that's largely constructed by people to d
if the court continues down the path of sitting dog sniffs are not searches at all, law enforcement will be completely unfettered to use drug dogs however they wish. that could lead to a random sweeps of neighborhoods where people. limited and only by the restrictions the fourth abutment has on seizures. more broadly, again, as technology develops, if the court continues down the path of sitting there are some searches that, a detect contraband and are not searches at all, the encroachments on our privacy are going to increase ever further as technology moves on. >> i was a little puzzled as to what the florida supreme court really meant -- really wanted in the harris case. it is not just enough to say the dog has been certified, you need more performance evidence. how would that work? every time there is a case where drug evidence is used, the prosecution would have to come and and a show, what, there is some sort of test? he has gone out 100 times -- what would be the evidence that would be enough to convince a judge this dog was reliable? what's the traditional test for probable
program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, law school, 157 years of tradition. it is also in world that has continued to face ongoing controversy surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidenced by the attorney general's further charges level yesterday. today i want to tell you about my world, the realities of running an institution the size and scope of penn state while dealing with widely divergent perceptions. i want to share the wonderful law activities and accomplishments of our students and faculty and staff over this agonizing year. by any reasonable definition they are newsworthy stories but i understand you may not be willing to listen to them until we show you how this year has changed us. what have we learned about ourselves and what are we trying to do with that knowledge? i will speak candidly about how the last year has affected by in state and how the impact has gone beyond central pennsylvania to shape policies that colleges and
. >> it'd be pretty difficult for him to actually repeal the healthcare law within 24 hours. he would need to go to congress and we'd still have to wait and see if republicans are in control of the senate or the house. >> sarah kliff covers healthcare issues for the washington post. while she says democratic control of the senate would throw a wrench into romney's plans, there are immediate steps a romney administration could take to start to undo obama's signature piece of legislation. >> one option the romney administration could pursue is not offering funds to the various departments that are supposed to implement the health care law. that could really slow down and make it very difficult to implement the law even if it were left standing as a law. >> for all the rancor surrounding the legislation, the percentage of americans with medical insurance has barely budged since the law was passed 31 months ago. according to the census an estimated 84.3 percent of americans had medical insurance last year compared to 83.7 percent the year before. because of the legislation, a few million young
beloved cousin and in law. prayers as you move through this season of sorrow. and of grief. thank you for sharing george breathes with you. profoundly george stanley mcgovern as a son an example of our heritage, i each of you for coming celebrate and honor senator mcgovern's life and witness. to share the mcgovern family's brief. to political colleague, a trusted mentor -- [no audio] and prairie form them to embrace common person and to tirelessly worked for the common good. george mcgovern was also a prairie prophet. he called and inspired an generation to do justice, to love mercy and to walk with our god. he focused the world's on the plight of the hungry. fought for peace. he called on us to repent a misguided, wasteful, and selfish to seeking and speaking the truth. articulate it in his hometown to and not in nazareth to preach the good news to the poor, to be prisoners, to give sight to the blind and to proclaim the year of the lord's savior. we can learn much from jesus' experience in bringing good to the poor and liberating the oppressed. of teaching and preaching in galilee.
many states that were trying to do a voter suppression with the idea laws, now we have won the most of that. now we have to be careful that the accurate count is given. everybody in the campaign has to be ready for recounting. if it goes to the supreme court, but we have to go there. host: are you still there? caller: it must be fair. host: from our twitter page -- steve is joining us from virginia on the republican line. caller: there is no such thing as a voter suppression, that is just silly. there is a voter fraud as was revealed by james keene where he recorded the son of jim moran telling somebody how to commit of voter fraud. there are lots of dead people that are registered. that was the purpose of this to get the dead people off of the voter rolls. the process is going forward in virginia. everybody who registers in virginia gets a voter i.d.. it is a responsibility. a lot of people did not want to have anything to do with responsibility. host: thank you for the call. eight romney ryan white house, it could happen. -- a romney-biden white house, it could happen. the magic n
-span2. now more from the fordham law school conference. next, we hear from former cia acting general counsel john rizzo, and former justice department inspector general lyn fine. posted by the center on national security, this is an hour 20 minutes. >> okay, marty has charged us with finding all the solutions, and luckily i'm only the moderator so i would have to charge the three of you with giving us some solutions. i think the way this panel is organized is to provide context for what you just heard. i hadn't quite realized it would work as a will that we have the right people to give the right context, both in terms of the law, in terms of the post-9/11 decade and where it's taken us, in terms of the self-regulating institutional function of government, to figure out its own problems, make its own recommendations and maybe suggest its own solutions. and in terms of what all this means from the point of view of working in the field, on the ground, inside a covert realm. so we're going to try to tie this all together today by looking at some of these issues. and i have to trust that
coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helpe
forward with regulations that are inconsistent with the underlying law, and advisory opinions that are inconsistent, and implementations that is inconsistent with what congress intended and with what the law is. the work requirements for welfare cross it was very clear. i was a lead sponsor of the bill and there was no waiver capability for the report -- the work requirement, and he did it. immigration and others -- you have a bunch of issues. and what that does is create uncertainty. if the government can go and do what they want regardless of what the lot is -- what the law expert, and the government says coppola -- what the lot is, and the government says, and going to do it and go ahead and sue me. that is as much of the problem as the volume we have seen. the cost of the regulation is inconsistent with the underlying law that was passed by congress, or never even contemplated by congress. co2 is a toxic substance. i cannot imagine anyone who voted for the clean air act who would have suggested that was something that was covered under the definition when they passed that
reproduction. it's about the economy, that it's about race. when we think about jim crow laws, it was all about not allowing people of two different races to reproduce. i hadn't quite put it all together until i heard you say that, so i don't want other folks to misses that. and yet surprisingly the gender gap is less extreme than i might think it would be given these circumstances. is it -- when i look at the numbers, it says to me, yes, there's a gender gap, but it's still being driven primarily by women of color and by young women. so what's going on not just with the extremes of the republican party, but with women who hear this and i'm like, yeah, i'm town with them. what is that some. >> the conventional wisdom is when the republicans say these extreme things, those women will be turned off and vote if democrats. i don't think that's necessarily the case. it's not that they don't reject what is being said, because they do. but at the same time sometimes if you're independent and you are dead on the in middle, it's because you're turned off by booth pa both party. so democrats have to reme
that is an important thing to remember. i have a budget of law at -- a little more than $1 million, which is a lot three-person like me. a cultural institution for an impact with the entire city -- that is not a -- not that much. museums are run on a higher budget. university colleges, professors in universities are on a bigger budget. the point is that if we want to solve this and realize we want to have more coverage, there are ways to do that. we have setup a society that knows how to find institutions with that kind of impact. the "texas tribune," we inspired them -- now they inspire us with their ideas and structure. >> they are treated from people from a "texas monthly magazine" wanted to focus on local politics? >> we were featured on the front page of the "new york times" after investigations we did. they told us, what can we do here? they decided they wanted to do an entity in austen that covers politics relevant to the entire state. now they're running on a $5 million budget. we are all talking at that. that is a lot of money for the -- not a lot of money for the type of impact that inst
, a law school, and 157 years of tradition. it's also a world that has continued to face ongoing controversies surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators, and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidence by the attorney generals further charges leveled yesterday. today, i want to tell you something about my world with the realities of running an institution the size and scope of penn state while dealing with widely divergent perceptions. i want to share the many wonderful activities and accomplishments of the students and faculty and staff over this agonizing year. by any reasonable definition, they are newsworthy stories. i understand that you may not be willing to listen to them until we show you how this year has changed us. what we learned about ourselves and what are we trying to do with that knowledge? i will speak candidly about how the last year affected penn state, and how the impact has gone beyond central pennsylvania to shape policies at colleges and universities across the nation. i'll share our strategies for the ye
, corporations, unions, other associations, not permitted to make contributions. that has been the law for more than 40 years. they are allowed to spend their own money independently of the campaign if they want to put cannot make such a patient. typically, presidential candidates raise money at the maximum level, they are well known nationally, lots of wealthy individuals and groups that want to support them. the obama campaign stands out in that respect of it. it is also importantthan 40 yea. they are allowed to spend their own to note, the caller is making another race has been more focused in many respects on a small number of individual people. these people have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that get you into a majority of the money, about 60% of the outside money, has been raised from about 200 individuals. the number of people you could fit on an airplane have respecta small number of individual people. these people have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that get you into a majority of the money
. >> oh, yes they change the law and make the crimes legal. this is what obama understood in april of '08. he nailed it. he said these guys changed the rules of the game. allowed them to operate by like bandits, and it was done under george w. bush's watch. there isn't difference between romney and bush. >> that raises the critical question. why doesn't the romney campaign say look at the parallel of george w. bush it seems to be a winning argument. >> and it's an accurate one. we lost the populous in obama. interest is no spirit there. there is no guts. that's why he lost the first debate. he's not feeling our pain. the pain is very widespread. if you lost your house 50 million americans have lost their homes or they're going to lose it. they have to change neighbors give up schools. their kids think they're losers. they did something wrong. this guy is not addressing this. >> eliot: was he more akin to the plutocats that you write so persuasively about in your book. >> i think by invocation and personality he's a techno contract. he could be member of the plutocats if he wanted to. that
requirements, changed the federal law, and moved this building from a clinic and put the hospital in. we are literally already have the building and just forced the hospital in and i keep on thinking, that is, you know, somebody willie brown's shoes that he had a nice pair of shoes he didn't wear, except for church every sunday. one day he couldn't fit the shoe, you know? that was the only pair of shoe he had. so, he said, rose, i just shoved my foot into the shoe, even though it did not quite fit. but it looked nice when i was sitting down. so that is exactly what we did with the clinic next door. it didn't fit, it was not built for a hospital. but we just jammed everything in to make it work. and behold, 30 years later, now we have to build a new one because of new regulations and new laws. but anyway, that changed my whole life, my relationship with the community, and respect for some of our family associations, of what they have accomplished before us. so this is where we are at. and what we are doing is very small compared to what they had to do years ago when the condition was not
. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ with such power, [ rumbling, crowd screaming ] the results could be felt around the world. twice the stain fighting power as the leading liquid value brand. era detergent. a lot of fight for a little dough. ee . >>> if the romney campaigns ends, lower standard even by the romney campaign. what mitt romney is doing with the story on jobs in ohio is something new. here's how it started in ohio last week. >> i saw a story today, that one of the great manufacturers in this state, jeep, now owned by the italians, is thinking of moving all production to china. >> romney immediately got called out by that by conservative newspaper that endorsed him and by jeep's parent company, calling the statement a leap that would be difficult even for professional circus acrobats. but -- well, maybe he didn't see those fact-checks. why else would he put out this ad? >> obama took gm and chrysler into bankruptcy and sold chrysler to italians who a
for law and order so they can bring aid to those affected by the conflict. the agency says more than 28,000 people have been forced out of their homes in the e latest wave of fighting. it's clearly urgent that law and order be restored so that violence can be prevented and so that access is facilitated for aid to be delivered to those in need. >> the latest outbreak of violence between buddhists and muslims in the state of rakine has continued since october 21st. the local government says that at least 84 people have been killed. the conflict first erupted earlier this year after a group of muslims allegedly assaulted a buddhist woman. the united nations is suppes trefugees in the cy area. >> the camps in and around sitwe are already hosting most of the 75,000 people who remain displaced in the wave of violence that broke out in june this year. with a new influx these already crowded camps are being stretched beyond capacity in terms of space, shelter, and basic supplies. >> meanwhile, the association of southeast asian nations is promising to respond to conflict in one of its member co
point and that is that there are state laws that deal with voter fraud or intimidation, and those laws can be invoked to go after those who are trying to deny the american people or deny the people of a particular state an opportunity to exercise their franchise and they ought to be enforced. there are battalions of attorneys now preparing for i election day but we have to keep in mind that certain tricks and tactics that have been used up to this point could and are aimed to try to discourage people from voting. you wonder why can't we have an up or down vote on the president of the united states without trying to confuse people for deprive them of their right to vote. people playing this system and creating phony issues or trying to deny people an opportunity to vote, they ought to be held accountable, and the way to do it is through not only filing lawsuits but use available laws to take action against them. >> cenk: thank you so much for joining us. really appreciate it. >> thank you very much. >> cenk: great to hear from congressman kucinich. when we come back, ben is sitting in l
party said, quote, for one side to demand that we break the law because they feel like they are losing. break the law? since when is voting breaking the law? decades ago we faced jim crow and the polls. today it's fewer hours and longer lines. but the goal is the same. voter suppression. joining me now is former florida governor charlie crist. he's now an independent. tonight he's introducing former president clinton at an obama rally. governor, thanks so much for your time tonight. >> reverend, it's great to be with you, reverend al. thank you. >> now, let me ask you directly. wouldn't extending voting hours be the right thing for governor scott to do here? you did it in 2008 as the governor of florida and you are republican. what would be wrong with scott doing that today? >> there would be nothing wrong with it, reverend. it would be the right thing to do. it's a precious, cherished right and all of us want to have an opportunity to exercise. yesterday i was in miami guard dense in north dade county and the wait was 2 1/2 to three hours. it's unconscienceable to let that go on. the
common ground to make sure our tax laws are more competitive and simple. if we do that, i think we will send a message to the world america is open for business again. >> i think what the audience sought is he was asked a question about his senate record and he was talking about being governor. he is running for reelection to the united states senate. he had a fiscal irresponsibility. george came into the united states senate with historic surpluses. we were in great shape. by the time he left, we had massive deficits. he voted to increase the debt by $16,000 every second he was in the senate. he expanded medicare, which was good, but he did not pay for it. he was part of a senate and a house that declared two wars but did not pay for the wars and instead put them on the credit card for our kids to pay. he made a massive tax cuts to health -- to help the wealthy. he did not pay for them. we went from surplus to deficit. he voted four times to raise his own pay. he voted four times to raise the debt with it, he voted for 52,000 earmarks that totaled $121 billion. even george had to
in the hostilities and therefore to kill them would be a war crime under international law, under the geneva convention. noncombatants who are summarily executed, that constitutes a war crime. it went on to say the u.n. human rights council is gathering evidence of violations carried out by both sides in syria and building a case. it seems this video, too, will be part of the evidence, if that case comes up before the international criminal court. >> if it does take it further, what does that mean? what would achieve? >> we see people from the former warsaw in yugoslavia in the international criminal court at the hague now. people are tried. the people who are subject to those violations, the victims and victims' families are allowed to say what happened to them. very severe prison sentences are handed out. at the moment we are seeing one of the purposes of the international criminal court is not just to provide justice but to show future possible violators that the there is snow impunity. this is exactly what the u.n. is threatening this morning. if you commit a violation such as what appea
to do what? last i checked, administer laws passed by congress. i think there's an open question whether they are doing that consistently across the board whether it's an energy space, environmental space, ect.. it's our job as attorneys general to participate in that transaction is preserved. that's why we filed a lawsuit. we'll see where it heads. it's less about the tax breaks for those corporations. it's more about what responsibility and opportunity has been vested in the state by the affordable care act in preserving that as a stake holder. >> i'm lee parsely with outside lawyer protection for lawsuit reform. in texas, there's a number of statutes that allow attorney general to have multiple violations. for a company that has inadvertently vollied the statute multiple times, those penalties can be substantial. at least philosophically, we've become concerned with that. do y'all have similar statutes in your state? is that an issue that we ought to have on the radar for those of us who are supporting the business community and their concerns about litigation? >> i can take that. tha
indiscriminately and kill a lot of civilians, that's also a violation of international law. >> warner: but the threat of legal action offers no protection to these students, who now dream of what they'll become when they grow up. >> dentist. >> teacher". >> warner: no one can tell them when this war will end, what kind of country they will inherit, and whether they'll live to fulfill those dreams. >> brown: next, immigration may not be a front-burner issue for the presidential candidates right now, but it is something many voters care about in the swing state of iowa. paul yeager of iowa public television reports on how demographic shifts in his state are changing the political landscape. his story is part of our new collaboration with public media partners across the country from areas that will likely determine the outcome of the election in a series we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: last fall, in the run up to the republican caucuses, illegal immigration was a hot topic on the campaign trail in iowa. >> if you hire someone who is illegal, we're going to sanction you.
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